St Mary’s Church in Osnabrück

We agreed to meet up with Carol Saint-Clair again on Friday afternoon in order to conclude our tour of historic Osnabrück by visiting two of the city’s great churches: the Lutheran St Mary’s Church (St Marienkirche) on Mrktplatz and the Catholic St Peter’s Cathedral (Dom) a block or so away.  First stop was St Mary’s Church.

The buttressed east side of St Marienkirche.

The buttressed east side of St Marienkirche.

Gargoyle on the church's east side.

Gargoyle on the church’s east side.

The present St Mary’s is probably the second or third church to be built on the Mrktplatz. A simple one-nave church stood on the place in the early 11th century. By 1300 the church had grown to a Gothic three-nave structure with aisles. Arches were added in the 15th century. As Osnabrück grew over the centuries to be a prominent member of the Hanseatic League its prominent citizens began to look upon St Mary’s as their own church as opposed to the Cathedral a block away and its Rome-appointed Bishop. The Protestant Reformation came to Osnabrück in 1543 and St Mary’s became a Lutheran church. Today it is part of the Evangelical Lutheran State Church of Hanover.

View of altar from the church's west side.

View of altar and triumphal cross from the church’s west side.

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This room is in back, behind the organ and under the west tower.

The baptismal font dates from the 1560s.

The baptismal font dates from 1560.

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Stained glass window by 2oth century artist Johannes Streiter.

Stained glass window by 2oth century artist Johannes Schreiter was installed in 1992.

The winged altar was built in 1500.

The winged altar was built in 1515 in Antwerp.

The triumphal cross over the altar dates from 1400.

The triumphal cross over the altar dates from the 13th century.

Last supper table and sculpture by Hans Freiber.

Last supper table and sculpture by Heinz Heiber (installed in 1995).

Same view but with my camera held vertically.

Same view but with my camera held vertically.

Close-up of table and sculpture.

Close-up of table and sculpture.

Views from altar looking west.

Views from altar looking west.

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The Flintor organ was built in Zaandam, Netherlands and installed in 1992.

The Flentrop organ was built in Zaandam, Netherlands and installed in 1967. It was also extensively restored in 1998.

Tombstone inscription for Justus Moser, a prominent 18th century jurist who lived in Osnabrück.

Tombstone inscription for Justus Moeser, a prominent 18th century jurist who lived in Osnabrück.

St Marien

St Mary and Child (Marie mit Kind), sculpture from the 16th century.

We then walked from Mrktplatz to Domplatz and visited St Peter’s Cathedral. That will be the subject of my next posting.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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About crowcanyonjournal

I am a family man with interests in family history, photography, history and travel.
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4 Responses to St Mary’s Church in Osnabrück

  1. mvschulze says:

    These images and that church are beyond incredible. The subtle hues, and fine details present themselves most impressively. As it is 2 AM here in NJ, I’ll wait for tomorrow to enjoy your text. Thanks as usual for your remarkable posts. M (I,m becoming more and more curious about the details of your images. For example, do you bracket exposures?)

  2. No, I don’t bracket exposures. I use a Canon 60D and usually a 24-105mm zoom lens. I also have a Tokina wide angle lens and a 50 mm lens. I always shoot in raw and post process with Lightroom 4, moving sliders back and forth. Moving the highlights slider all the way to the left and the shadows slider all the way to the right does wonders to blown-out skies and stained glass windows! I also use the lens correction sliders a lot to straighten building shots.

  3. Pingback: Twenty Churches in Twenty Days | Crow Canyon Journal

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