London 2013: The Views from Greenwich Park

Greenwich Park is London’s oldest enclosed park (established in 1443) and most 0f the places that collectively are called Maritime Greenwich are within its boundaries.

xx

The tree-lined path from the National Maritime Museum.

After visiting the National Maritime Museum we walked past Nelson’s Ship in a Bottle and headed up the tree-lined patch that leads to the Royal Observatory on top of the hill.

xx

Some of the trees on the park were just beginning to change color.

After a while the path becomes pretty steep. There’s an easier (but longer) way to the observatory for wheelchairs, etc. if you follow The Avenue south of the main path.

xx

Still another view.

xx

Leaving the level area.

xx

Several paths criss-cross the park.

As you climb higher and higher the views of London get better and better.

xx

The Queen’s House with Canary Wharf skyscrapers in the background.

xx

The Greenwich Power Station serves as a backup power station for the London Underground.

xx

The level area immediately behind the Queen’s House was the site for equestrian events (and a portion of the modern pentathlon) at the 2012 Olympics Games. Some of the Paralympics events were also held here.

When we reached the observatory we found out that there was a half-hour wait to get into the areas that charged an admission fee. So we walked around Greenwich Park for a half-hour admiring all the views.

xx

General James Wolfe was the victor of the Battle of the Plains of Abraham in Quebec. Both he and his French counterpart Louis-Joseph de Montcalm were fatally wounded in the battle. Wolf’e’s family lived in Greenwich and he is buried under St Alfege’s Church.

xx

The view from the Wolfe Monument. The Shard is on the extreme left. City of London skyscrapers are in the middle background.

xx

Christopher Wren laid out the Queen’s House and Royal Hospital for Seamen so that the view of the Thames from the Queen’s House would be right between the two major buildings that would become the Royal Naval College.

xx

The Greenwich Power Station and the O2 (formerly the Millennium Dome).

xx

The view down Blackheath Ave from the Wolfe Monument. The steeple of All Saints Church in Blackheath is in the background.

xx

Another view from the Wolfe Monument, showing a damaged chestnut tree.

xx

A close-up view of the damaged chestnut tree.

xx

Another venerable chestnut tree nearby.

xx

Canary Wharf and the Greenwich Power Station.

xx

The Jubilee Dolphin Sundial in the Titanic Memorial Garden in back of the Observatory.

After visiting the observatory (see my next posting) we walked down the path for a bit but then veered off and meandered down the lawn until we got to the park’s edge at the intersection of Park Row and Park Vista.

xx

What could be more fun than rolling down the hill after visiting the Observatory?

xx

Our final view of the Observatory before exiting on Park Vista  and Park Row. The main path up the hill is where all the trees are on the right.

We stopped for lunch at the Plume of Feathers pub on Park Vista and then walked down to the Trafalgar Tavern at the end of Park Row on the Thames. Then we walked through the Old Naval College back to the Cutty Sark and our DLR station.

xx

The Plume of Feathers is possibly the oldest pub in Greenwich.

xx

Park Row is the boundary of Greenwich Park and the Old Royal Naval College.

xx

The Trafalgar Tavern at the end of Park Row.

My next three postings will cover the Royal Observatory, the views from the Trafalgar Tavern and our walk through the Old Royal Naval College.

Advertisements

About crowcanyonjournal

I am a family man with interests in family history, photography, history and travel.
This entry was posted in London, Travel and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to London 2013: The Views from Greenwich Park

  1. gpcox says:

    Hard to believe that chestnut tree survived. Guess that’s the survival trait in all of us.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s