Paris 2014: One Photo Plus Two Crops Equals Three Pics

I spent most of the time on my second visit to the Louvre last May in the Richelieu Wing viewing Northern European paintings of the 16th and 17th centuries and French sculptures of the 5th through 19th centuries. The sculptures filled two floors of the wing and also spilled out into two glass-roofed courtyards. I was fascinated by the way the sun-roof’s shadows painted diagonal lines across the courtyard, contrasting with the building’s horizontal and vertical architectural lines; and so I took several photos of the statues in both the Cour Marly and the Cour Puget.

I wasn’t too happy with one photo, mainly because the bottom corners were just not interesting. So I cropped. Twice.

The original photo showing French sculpture on multiple tiers of the Puget Courtyard in the Louvre's Richelieu wing.

The original photo showing French sculpture on multiple tiers of the Puget Courtyard in the Louvre’s Richelieu wing.

The original picture was horizontal and it showed off the horizontal planes of the building. Then I cropped the photo leaving only the central scene to make it a vertical picture and the vertical lines of the building were at once emphasized. The two people in the background also lent a sense of scale to the size of the statues around them and the windows above them. I liked this picture a lot better.

The vertical crop of the center of the original photo, emphasizing the building's vertical lines and the size of the statues.

The vertical crop of the center of the original photo, emphasizing the building’s vertical lines and the size of the statues.

Then I concentrated on the right side of the original photo and cropped again but with the same horizontal ratio as the original. The horizontal portions of the building’s architecture are emphasized in this picture, perhaps even more so than the original photo. And there are several people in this picture. A couple of them are showing a lot of emotion with their body language as they view the statues before them. One person is taking a picture with a tablet computer. I can’t tell if he is taking a selfie with the statue behind him or a photo of another statue that is to our right and not in the picture. Then there are two people who seem to be looking straight at me. I wonder if they know that they are in the picture I am taking! I think this is the most interesting of the three pictures but the first crop is a better composition.

The horizontal crop of the right side of the original photo, emphasizing the body language of the people on the balcony viewing the nearby sculptures.

The horizontal crop of the right side of the original photo, emphasizing the body language of the people on the balcony viewing the nearby sculptures.

What do you think?

I’ll show some more photos of the courtyard sculptures in a future posting.

PS: For those of you who are technically inclined, I used my Canon 60D with a Tokina 11-16mm wide angle zoom for this shot. The photo was taken at 16mm (equivalent to 25.6 mm on a camera with a full-size sensor), at f 7.1 and in 1/250th second. Post-processing of the raw image was done entirely in Lightroom 5.

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About crowcanyonjournal

I am a family man with interests in family history, photography, history and travel.
This entry was posted in Paris, Travel and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to Paris 2014: One Photo Plus Two Crops Equals Three Pics

  1. Rajiv says:

    Good stuff. I like Lightroom, by the way

  2. Pingback: Paris 2014: The Cour Marly in the Louvre’s Richelieu Wing | Crow Canyon Journal

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