Portugal’s Pena Palace in Monochrome

My wife and I traveled to Portugal in the spring of 2010 and one day we took the train from central Lisbon to Sintra about 25 km away to see the Pena Palace (Palacio Nacional da Pena), the summer home for Portugal’s royalty during the 19th century. It was built by King Ferdinand II on the ruins of a monastery. The last queen of Portugal spent the night here before leaving for exile in Brazil at the start of the Portuguese Revolution in 1910. It has since been classified as a national monument and museum and was declared a UNESCO world heritage site in 1995.

The Pena National Palace. This will be my entry for Leanne Cole's Monochrome Madness Challenge this week.

The Pena National Palace. This will be my entry for Leanne Cole’s Monochrome Madness Challenge this week.

The Pena Palace was designed in the romantic tradition by Baron Wilhelm Ludvig von Eschwege and contains a mixture of neo-Gothic, neo-Manueline, neo-Islamic and neo-Renaissance styles.

Here are a few more pictures of the Pena Palace converted to monochrome:

pena-9712pena-9697pena-9695

This lovely creature guards the main entrance to the palace. It's called a newt and is supposed to symbolize the creation of the world.

This lovely creature guards the main entrance to the palace. It’s called a newt and is supposed to symbolize the creation of the world.

Here we are at one of the many palace view spots. I took a picture of anther couple with their camera and one of them returned the favor and took this picture with my camera.

Here we are at one of the many palace view spots. I took a picture of anther couple with their camera and one of them returned the favor and took this picture with my camera.

View of the palace between the trees on our way back down the hill.

View of the palace between the trees on our way back down the hill.

The train from Rossio station in Lisbon is very inexpensive. From the Sintra train station you can either walk up a steep hill for about 2 km to the palace or take the bus (Tourist Bus 434). We took the bus. We also paid for the complete palace tour but were not allowed to take photographs inside the palace. You can also walk along the many paths on the palace grounds and even walk all the way to the Castle of the Moors on a nearby hill but we didn’t have the time. The Castle of the Moors (Castelo dos Mouros) was built in the 8th and 9th centuries, taken over by Christian forces in the 12th century and was in ruins for several centuries until restored by Ferdinand II in the 1840s and 50s. It is now part of the Sintra Cultural Landscape along with the Pena Palace.

The Castle of the Moors overlooking Sintra.

The Castle of the Moors overlooking Sintra. It’s about a 2 km walk from the Pena Palace.

Drop by Leanne Cole’s website to see what other photographers are doing in monochrome these days.

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About crowcanyonjournal

I am a family man with interests in family history, photography, history and travel.
This entry was posted in Portugal, Travel and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

8 Responses to Portugal’s Pena Palace in Monochrome

  1. Peter Klopp says:

    Beautiful images of an impressive world heritage site! Following your blog is like traveling to places I have not seen before. Thanks for sharing!

  2. disperser says:

    I like the texture brought out by the processing, especially the second photo.

    • Thanks. I used the pinhole preset in Nik Silver Efex Pro 2.0 for 6 of the 8 photos (# 6 and # 8 were different presets). For photo # 5 (the newt) I went back to Lightroom after processing in Silver Efex Pro and fiddled around with a number of sliders to get the final result.

  3. I love the framing of the that second image! Nice history lesson too!

  4. beautiful monochromes Crow!! They are like fairy tale etchings.I too love the framed second image but all are brillilant!!

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