A Walk in Central Madrid, Part Two

After Puerta del Sol we walked a couple of blocks south to Plaza de Jacinto Benavente to see if Maestro, our favorite chocolateria, was still there. It was and we had a nice mid-day snack of hot chocolate and churros.

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A little store called Be Happy near Plaza de Jacinto Benavente. See here for a monochrome version of this photo which was my entry to Leanne Cole’s Monochrome Madness 3-1.

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Jacinto Benavente was a popular 20th century Spanish playwright. He won the Nobel Prize for literature in 1922. My mother-in-law’s maiden name was Benavente and my wife has a zillion Benavente cousins.

From Plaza de Jacinto Benavente we walked south again until we came upon another plaza. This one is called La Plaza de Tirso de Molina.

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Tirso de Molina was a Spanish Baroque dramatist of the 17th century.

From here we decided to backtrack a bit and zig-zag in a northwesterly direction until we came upon Plaza Mayor, a popular tourist spot which we first visited in 2010.

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Plaza de Santa Cruz from the entrance to Plaza Mayor. That’s Iglesia Santa Cruz on the left. The building on the right is the Palacio de Santa Cruz. It was once a prison but now it houses the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Cooperation.

Entrance to Plaza Mayor. I was facing Plaza de Santa Cruz when I shot the previous photo. Them I turned around 180 degrees and took this shot.

Entrance to Plaza Mayor. I was facing Plaza de Santa Cruz when I shot the previous photo. Then I turned around 180 degrees and took this shot.

Plaza Mayor is a completely enclosed rectangle with an equestrian statue of King Phillip III in the middle of the square.

Plaza Mayor is a completely enclosed rectangle with an equestrian statue of King Phillip III in the middle of the square.

From Plaza Mayor we walked east along Calle de Atocha all the way back to Paseo del Prado.

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There was a long line of people waiting to get into the Iglesia de la Santa Cruz. The entrance to Plaza Mayor is in the background.

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View of Calle de San Sebastian from Calle de Atocha. The building on the left is the Palacio de Tapa, now a luxury hotel. It was designed by Juan de Villanueva, the same architect who designed the Prado and Plaza Mayor.

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This monument in La Plaza de Anton Martin is dedicated to those who were killed in the Massacre of 1977. Some neofascist terrorists attacked an Calle de Atocha office and murdered five people and wounded four more.

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Statue of Baroque painter Bartolome Esteban Murillo in Plaza de Murillo near the south entrance to the Prado.

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Trees lining Paseo del Prado in front of The Prado.

Iglesia San Jeronimo del Real stands on a hill in back of The Prado. The Cloisters next to the church has been completely remodeled and is now part of The Prado.

La Iglesia de San Jeronimo el Real stands on a hill in back of The Prado. The Cloisters next to the church has been completely remodeled and is now part of The Prado.

I spent a couple of hours re-visiting the Prado while my wife rested. Then both of us re-visited the Thyssen before dining at a nearby restaurant. See here for more on our museum tours.

That was our last night in Spain. The next morning we flew back to San Francisco by way of New York.

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About crowcanyonjournal

I am a family man with interests in family history, photography, history and travel.
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One Response to A Walk in Central Madrid, Part Two

  1. gorgeous images Crow!!

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